Facebook Posts – September 17-18, 2015

Currie Mixon

September 17, 2015

We have looked into it and have again been told by the City that the only way the sidewalk petition, as passed by the City Council, can be retracted is if 100% of those owners that signed it retract their signature. Does anyone else have a different understanding of the state of this petition?

I think it is great that we have had so much communication about the specific concerns that our neighbors have. Many of them we share. I also hope that we feel more unified by these communications than we are made divided. However, the way it seems to me, there is not really any feasible way to dramatically change what was passed other than design details at this point. I think it’s absolutely worthwhile for us to continue to voice our opinions to the City, unified where we can be, but I also want everyone to have realistic expectations and the information that I have about this project.

Comments

Barbara ScottThank you for conveying what you have learned so clearly.

Like · 1 · September 17, 2015 at 11:04am
Erin SalmonI have been trying to find all the possibilities around a rehearing from calling and emailing the city, as well as using the city’s website. You have been able to get more information than I. Could you tell me who you communicated with directly?
Like · September 17, 2015 at 11:27am · Edited
Currie MixonSharon talked to Donetta Powell.
Like · September 17, 2015 at 1:28pm

Erin SalmonI have also called the Transporation Planning Manager of the city to find out the real process and specific policies around how much input residents have during the design phase and how we make sure our concerns are heard. I echo another sentiment you voiced in a previous post, Currie. My trust in the political process, as well as the city holding to its word of concern for the environment and for protecting established neighborhoods is shaken from this petition specifically.

Like · September 17, 2015 at 11:30am · Edited

Currie MixonI really do find it funny that it seems like you are saying that the petition caused the hard feelings. The petition was the process by which the City sees what kind of support there is for a project. It is not directed at making you upset, David. And should you choose to get upset about it after it was decided, that is unfortunate. But if you feel you are justified in seeking blame, I would challenge you to seek a different perspective.
 Like · September 17, 2015 at 1:37pm
Ryan BarnumSo is going door to door asking all of the people that signed the petition to retract their signatures, and explain that we are all going to work together to come up with a better plan that appeases everybody, out of the question? I think people, given the opportunity to understand the situation and the turmoil this has caused, and knowing it’s not just going to be tossed away completely, would be willing to consider it. I think trying that instead of relying on the speculation that the designers MIGHT work with the homeowners is a better plan.
 Like · 3 · September 17, 2015 at 7:03pm
Erin SalmonThat is exactly what I have been working on, and so far I have spoken directly with 11 out of the 28 signers of the petition to consider just what you have proposed, Ryan. That is also why I organized the meeting for Monday. To fully inform the street and the Kentwood – Bushy Branch Creek neighborhood what our collective options are to address the many needs and concerns that we have.
 Like · 2 · September 17, 2015 at 9:54pm
Currie MixonI can’t help but be skeptical here. It seems like the implication is that the neighborhood is being asked to trust that a new petition for a sidewalk will be developed and spearheaded by someone who does not think a sidewalk is right for the neighborhood. Am I misunderstanding?
 Like · September 18, 2015 at 11:11am
Barbara ScottI think where the city’s petition process breaks down is that it allows anyone with a vested interest in the outcome, one way or another, to present a petition and ask people to sign it. The process would be unbiased if a specialist with no interest in the outcome presented the petition. Someone knowledgeable about the petitioning and design processes and relevant city code. And someone who can answer each person’s questions about the project without personal bias.
 Like · 1 · September 19, 2015 at 9:07am · Edited
 Barbara Scott – So one constructive piece of action for me is to write the city council and tell them that in a city this big with this many competing interests, their investment in hiring a petition specialist might save them a lot of headaches. I imagine that most sidewalk petitions end up with some people feeling disenfranchised and others feeling blamed for getting involved.
Like · September 19, 2015 at 9:14am
Ryan BarnumI understand your skepticism here Currie. I do believe however that there is very little trust in the city doing what’s best for this neighborhood. I have way more trust in the people living here coming together on this matter to compromise and put together a comprehensive plan that is best for the neighborhood and all of us living here. This is something that could be spearheaded not by one anti-sidewalk person, but the collective community as a whole. I think that’s a much better approach than leaving it all to chance and speculation. We have an opportunity now to reverse this and make it right, but that window is closing and I would rather work together with everybody here, than feel like we are all butting heads and harboring resentment towards one another.
 Like · 3 · September 18, 2015 at 11:50am

Shannon BellezzaI agree, Ryan. Currie Mixon, I would say that it is a good indication that you should trust the neighbors that a good deal of the discussion here has focused on alternative sidewalk plans, maybe more so than alternative-to-sidewalk plans. Those who may not have wanted a sidewalk have entertained the possibility of alternative sidewalk plans and have shown that they are open to compromise. I feel that there have been many alternatives suggested (sidewalk and non-sidewalk alternatives) that would be in keeping with the character and aesthetic of the neighborhood.

Like · 2 · September 18, 2015 at 12:17pm · Edited

 

.  .  .  .  .  .

Currie Mixon

September 18, 2015

I did not start this page – my wife did. However, she left and I have become an administrator. I have been wrestling with the fact that this is a “Secret Group”. I think that, while it encourages very open dialogue, it also may encourage unfiltered snipes and the presentation of opinion as fact. That’s not what a neighborhood-focused group forum should be. Therefore, at the end of the day tomorrow, I am going to change the settings of this to open up the group to be a public group.
Now would be a time for everyone to take a look at what they’ve said and decide whether they want those comments to stand in the open.

Comments

Erin Salmon – Thank you, Currie, for the update. I know that Sharon also started an Avent West neighborhood FB page that is a closed group. I do not fully understand the designations. Is a closed group better for privacy than a public group? I know a closed group is different from a secret group designation.

Like · September 18, 2015 at 12:43pm

Currie Mixon – Yes – Sharon wanted a neighborhood group where the topics of the postings were more neighborhood in character and not almost singularly dedicated to the sidewalk petition issue.

Like · 1 · September 18, 2015 at 1:44pm
Ryan Barnum – A public group means anybody can see the group, the members, and the posts.
A closed group means anyone can find the group and see who is in it. Only members can see posts.
A secret group means only members can find the group and see posts.
I don’t know if a public group means anyone can join and post however, or if you still need to send a request to join and post.

Like · 3 · September 18, 2015 at 1:14pm

Currie Mixon – Thanks for doing a much better job than I could at explaining that, Ryan. The public group option that I am going to set won’t change the membership setting – that will remain our current invitation/approval approach.

Like · 3 · September 18, 2015 at 1:24pm

Barbara Scott – Sounds like a good idea to me: Anyone can see the posts. Other people who are contemplating submitting a sidewalk or street improvement petition for a neighborhood could benefit from seeing this discussion. Hindsight is always better than foresight. Airing people’s ideas before a petition ever gets submitted could help to ensure that a vote for or against a petition is well-informed. It’s rare, I think, that an outcome pleases everyone. Acceptance might be increased if people could contribute from the beginning.

Like · 1 · September 18, 2015 at 5:41pm · Edited